French Bulldog

The French Bulldog has enjoyed a long history as a companion dog. Created in England to be a miniature Bulldog, he accompanied English lacemakers to France, where he acquired his Frenchie moniker. Besides being a companion, he once served as an excellent ratter, but today his job focuses on being a fabulous family friend and show dog. He’s a rare dog breed, so expect to put in some time on a waiting list before you’re able to bring one home.

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The French Bulldog originated in 19th Century Nottingham, England, where lace makers decided to make a smaller, miniature, lap version of the English Bulldog that was referred to as a “toy” bulldog. In the 1860s, when the Industrial Revolution drove the craftsmen to France, they took their dogs with them. The toy bulldogs became popular in France and were given the name the “French Bulldog.” The breed eventually made its way back to England for dog shows. The Brits were not happy with the name “French” given to a dog that was originally from England, however the name “French Bulldog” stuck.

  

             

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The French Bulldog, like many other companion dog breeds, requires close contact with humans. They have fairly minimal exercise needs, but do require at least daily short walks. The French Bulldog is sometimes called ‘Frog dog’ or a ‘Clown dog.’ Frog dog is in reference to the way they sit with hind legs spread out. Clown dog is because they are known to be fun loving vivacious ‘clowns of the dog world.’Most French Bulldogs enjoy water. French Bulldogs are considered to make excellent companions. They rarely bark, and are patient and affectionate with their owners, especially with children, who are especially protected by the females. French Bulldogs can easily live with other breeds. French Bulldogs are wonderful companion dogs with a gentle nature. If you work at home, the Frenchie is happy to lie at your feet all day or follow you from room to room. People who love them describe them as mischievous goof balls and can’t imagine life without them. They are a constant presence, and they’ll love you with all the strength in their small bodies, proving time and again that beauty is on the inside.

Frenchies get along well with children, and they’re not so tiny that they can’t live in a household with a toddler. That said, no dog should ever be left alone with a young child. It’s just common sense to supervise and make sure that neither is poking or otherwise harassing the other. When they are socialized to them during puppyhood, Frenchies can get along well with other dogs and cats. Overly spoiled Frenchies, however, may be jealous toward other dogs, especially if those other dogs are getting attention from the Frenchie’s very own person.

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Sources:

http://dogtime.com/dog-breeds/french-bulldog

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Bulldog

http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/frenchbulldog.htm

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