Breeders: Labrador Retriever

The Labrador Retriever was bred to be both a friendly companion and a useful working dog breed. Historically, he earned his keep as a fisherman’s helper: hauling nets, fetching ropes, and retrieving fish from the chilly North Atlantic. Today’s Labrador Retriever is as good-natured and hard working as his ancestors, and he’s America’s most popular breed. These days the Lab works as a retriever for hunters, assistance dog to the handicapped, show competitor, and search and rescue dog, among other canine jobs.

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The Labrador Retriever not only loves kids, he enjoys the commotion they bring with them. He’ll happily attend a child’s birthday party, and even willingly wear a party hat. Like all dogs, however, he needs to be trained how to act around kids — and kids need to be taught how to act around the dog.

As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he’s eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog’s food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.

If a Lab has had plenty of exposure to other dogs, cats, and small animals, and has been trained how to interact with them, he’ll be friendly with other pets, too.

Labrador Retrievers are energetic dogs, delighted to work and play hard. They need to be taken on a daily, brisk, long walk, jog or run alongside you when you bicycle. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog’s mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. They will be in their glory if you give them a job to do. Gain weight easily, do not over feed.

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Labs are often acquired without any clear understanding of what goes into owning one. There are many Labs in need of adoption and or fostering in lab rescue groups. If you don’t see a rescue listed for your area, contact the national breed club or a local breed club and they can point you toward a Lab rescue.

Sources:

Dog Breed

Dog Time

Wikipedia

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