Breeders: Newfoundland

The Newfoundland is a large, strong dog breed from — wait for it — Newfoundland. He was originally used as a working dog to pull nets for fishermen and haul wood from the forest. He is a capable and hardworking dog, well suited to work on land or water. He is a strong swimmer and equally strong “pack horse.” Sweet-natured and responsive, he makes a wonderful family companion as well.

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  • The Newfoundland is a big dog when full grown. Though mellow, he’s not your basic one-bedroom apartment dog and would probably be happier in a more spacious setting.
  • He has has a strong work ethic, needs exercise, and mental stimulation. Ongoing training and dog sports are a perfect outlet for his working abilities.
  • If you can’t stand dog slobber, the Newfoundland is not for you. This breed drools. A lot.
  • To keep the Newfoundland’s thick coat looking great, he needs regular grooming. You can do it yourself, which is time consuming, or you can hire a professional groomer, which can be expensive.
  • The Newfoundland thrives in cool climates, though he can adapt to living in warmer climates. To protect him from heat stroke, keep him near air conditioning or fans when it’s really hot.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a shelter dog, a rescue group, or a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they’re free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.

The Newfoundland is known for his sweet disposition. He’s like a big, loveable Teddy Bear. He loves children, is intelligent, and aims to please. He’s happiest when he is with his family, and should not be left alone for long periods of time or be banished to the backyard or a kennel.

Like every dog, the Newfoundland needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences when young. Socialization helps ensure that your Newfoundland puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

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Newfoundlands are often acquired without any clear understanding of what goes into owning one. There are many Newfoundlands in need of adoption and or fostering. If you don’t see a rescue listed for your area, contact the national breed club or a local breed club and they can point you toward a Newfoundland rescue.

Sources:

Wikipedia

Dog Time

 

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