Pomeranian

The Pomeranian (often known as a Pom or Pom Pom) is a breed of dog of the Spitz type, named for the Pomerania region in Central Europe (today part of northern Poland and eastern Germany). Classed as a toy dog breed because of its small size, the Pomeranian is descended from the larger Spitz type dogs, specifically the German Spitz. It has been determined by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale to be part of the German Spitz breed; and in many countries, they are known as the Zwergspitz.

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The breed has been made popular by a number of royal owners since the 18th century. Queen Victoria owned a particularly small Pomeranian and consequently the smaller variety became universally popular. During Queen Victoria’s lifetime alone, the size of the breed decreased by 50%. Overall, the Pomeranian is a sturdy, healthy dog. The most common health issues are luxating patella and Tracheal collapse. More rarely, the breed can suffer from a skin condition colloquially known as “black skin disease”, or Alopecia X. This is a genetic disease which causes the dog’s skin to turn black and lose all or most of its hair.

Pomeranians are typically friendly, playful and lively but are often aggressive to other dogs Pomeranians are alert and aware of changes in their environment and barking at new stimuli can develop into a habit of barking excessively in any situation. They are somewhat defensive of their territory and will thus bark a lot when they encounter any outside noises. Pomeranians are intelligent dogs, respond well to training, and can be very successful in getting what they want from their owners.[12] They are extroverted and enjoy being the center of attention but can become quite aggressive and dominant if not well trained. The use of toys can be an effective tool in encouraging pomeranians to spend time alone.

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The bold and active Pomeranian loves to play, but he’s best suited to a home with older children who can be trusted to handle him carefully. Many breeders refuse to sell puppies to homes with very young children, for good reason. Sturdy though he is, the diminutive Pom is all too easily injured if he’s accidentally dropped or stepped on by a clumsy child.

Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he’s eating or to try to take the dog’s food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.

Sources:

Wikipedia

Dog Time

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